Developed in conjunction with Ext-Joom.com


Featured Books

Folk-Tales Of Kashmir

Kashmir as a field of folklore literature is, perhaps, not surpassed in fertility by any other country in the world; and yet, while every year witnesses the publication of books on the subject from Bengal, Bombay, Madras, Panjab, and other parts; and while each successive number of The Indian Antiquary, Indian Notes and Queries, and lately The Christian College Magazine and The Indian Evangelical Review, presents to us articles more or less relevant, this field, ripe for the harvest, has mained almost ungleaned. No doubt its isolated position and the difficulty of its language have had something to do with this apparent neglect. I am more glad, therefore, to have availed myself of the opportunities afforded me through a year’s residency in the valley. However, I hope the reader will not consider that I suppose the science of folklore should not include Comparative Mythology. On the contrary, I firmly believe that several tales must be attributed to a mythological origin. But I am also as firmly convinced that many tales must be attributed to a historical origin. “What seems to be demanded from every interpreter of old tradition, every explorer of the dark field of popular fiction, is a wariness that will not allow itself to be hoodwinked by any prejudice in favour of this or that particular theory. I would draw the attention of the folklorists to the notes in connection with these different stories. They have been gathered and arranged with some care, in the hope that they may help the reader to turn up readily to variants of the tales, or of different incidents in the tale. All Kashmiri or Hindustani words have been fully explained –at the end of the page on which they occur; and if they are ordinary, in the Glossary at the end of the book.
Rating: Not Rated Yet
Price:
Sales price: INR 750.00
Description
Kashmir as a field of folklore literature is, perhaps, not surpassed in fertility by any other country in the world; and yet, while every year witnesses the publication of books on the subject from Bengal, Bombay, Madras, Panjab, and other parts; and while each successive number  of The Indian Antiquary, Indian Notes and Queries, and lately The Christian College Magazine and The Indian Evangelical Review, presents to us articles more or less relevant, this field, ripe for the harvest, has  mained almost ungleaned. No doubt its isolated position and the difficulty of its language have had something to do with this apparent neglect. I am more glad, therefore, to have availed myself of the opportunities afforded me through a year’s residency in the valley. However, I hope the reader will not consider that I suppose the science of folklore should not include Comparative Mythology. On the contrary, I firmly believe that several tales must be attributed to a mythological origin. But I am also as firmly convinced that many tales must be attributed to a historical origin. “What seems to be demanded from every interpreter of old tradition, every explorer of the dark field of popular fiction, is a wariness that will not allow itself to be hoodwinked by any prejudice in favour of this or that particular theory. I would draw the attention of the folklorists to the notes in connection with these different stories. They have been gathered and arranged with some care, in the hope that they may help the reader to turn up readily to variants of the tales, or of different incidents in the tale. All Kashmiri or Hindustani words have been fully explained –at the end of the page on which they occur; and if they are ordinary, in the Glossary at the end of the book.       
Reviews
There are yet no reviews for this book.

Testimonials

The most reliable and trusted name in book business since several decades. Being the pioneers in the field of book publishing in Kashmir. 

Sheikh Ajaz

Subscribe